Skip to main content

Evolution

It is often said that Change is inevitable. Anything that doesn’t change, dies. If you think about it, it’s self evident. A tiger cannot always outrun its prey, sometimes it has to use stealth mode. A deer cannot always rely on camouflage, sometimes it has to outrun the tiger. Every species of animal, bird, insect on earth has adapted through out millennia to occupy the specific ecological niche that they now do. Even homo sapiens changed & adapted; albeit at an ever faster pace. It took us thousands of years to come down from the trees, hundreds to evolve agriculture, decades to expand science and now  technology which is changing our society every couple of years.

Yet…certain people refuse to adapt. Not surprisingly these are the same people who stand to lose the most from any sort of change. In fact they even say it’s good to not change! This slow death is called ‘tradition, culture, morals’  and what not. When I point out that change is good, they point to our 3000 years of tradition and say that hasn’t changed. 

Really? I’m sure that a thousand years ago, people slept at 11 pm and spent only 2 hours a day fighting for survival. I’d love to see all these people trying to farm the land and make food from scratch (no stainless steel knives, mixers, grinders, refrigerators/ovens/stoves allowed), live without cars, computers, television and air conditioning to name just a few.

Ever since the dawn of civilization, the advance of science and technology has forced society to change and adapt to it. There has never been a time when society has changed of its own volition and science was forced to adapt. No normal person with a modicum of intelligence could possibly believe that the invention of the wheel or the discovery of fire did not profoundly change the society that invented it. 

Yet humans have also seemingly evolved a resistance to change, more pronounced in Indians thanks to the seductive appeal of a 4000 year civilization to look back upon. Doesn’t matter that the past has been long since dead, buried and excavated again!

Beginning of Rant - Here’s a sample. In 200-300 years, clothes worn by women in various countries have evolved, all except India.

I’ve had several guys tell me that women look better in a saree. Yeah, well I’m not wearing clothes to make you happy dude! As always guys are so super cool with stuff so long as they’re not the ones who have to do it. It never fails to amaze me that women – emotional, weak creatures that we are – are expected to uphold the mighty tradition of Hindu culture! Why can’t the big strong men do it? Oh right, coz it’s too darn uncomfortable. And totally not worth it. End of Rant

Any which way I slice it, I don’t see what’s in it for me to keep this 4000 years of tradition going. If someone can explain, I’d be much obliged. Till then, I say Bring it(change) on!

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Why Don’t We Raise Our Sons like We Do Our Daughters?

This post originally appeard in Women's Web: Why Don’t We Raise Our Sons like We Do Our Daughters?

One of the hot button topics right now in Indian media is the safety of women – or rather how our country doesn't really care about half its population. From rape, sexual assault, harassment (in streets, public transport, nearly every public place) to violence perpetrated on women, Indians are finally getting around to discussing taboo topics.
One refrain that caught my eye throughout these debates – both online and off – is the fact that the reaction of the majority of Indians is the same: girls should stay at home, not go out after dark, dress appropriately and so on if they want to stay safe. No one seems to bat an eyelid when laying down these precautions for women. Except that the reality is women would be far safer if all the men simply DID NOT RAPE or HARASS any person that looks remotely female. No one has to stay at home and become a hermit! That got me thinking further. F…

One Step Up

Diya
Diya forced herself to relax while the attendant spread a mud pack on her face. She’d been nervous all week thinking about today. This was totally unlike the little beauty parlour she went to every month for eyebrow threading and the occasional haircut. No, this was a spa and they didn't just cut hair here. They styled it. And that was only the beginning of all the treatments a woman could get done. Normally she would have been too intimidated to even set foot inside, let alone enquire about the prices which she was sure would be too high for her budget.

But this visit was a gift from her dear mother for her 30th birthday. Luckily for her, the gift card was for a particular package which meant she would not be gaping like a fool at the exorbitant rates. Once again, Diya tried to relax telling herself that these women were being paid by her. She employed them and as much as she was sure they were secretly laughing at her naiveté, Diya wasn’t the one working for a living. But de…