Skip to main content

Through The Eyes Of A Child

This is the second in a series of stories, set in the game world of Banished. Read Part I.


It is a lot of fun being 8 years old. Acelyn says I'm old enough to help around the house but I have more fun playing outside with my friends. So many interesting things to see here! When I wake up in the morning, I can't wait to run outside and greet everyone. But first, I have to eat and bathe myself in the stream nearby. Brrr! Why is the water so cold always? I ask Acelyn everyday and she gives me the same reply. Wait and see. Well I don't have time to think about this, my friends are calling me already.

We are five of us, 3 girls and 2 boys. I am their leader, just like Acelyn is for the grownups. I make sure we don't forget the rules and run away into the forests. The trees are so tall and big, sometimes no light falls on the forest floor and it is very dark there. I wish I could explore on my own but I am the leader, everyone depends on me. They're always calling me "Berry, come here", "Berry over here"...

There is always work to be done, we still don't have houses and it gets really cold in the nights. Winter will come soon and Acelyn promised that it would snow. Snow! I have never seen it and neither has anyone else but I can't wait to touch it. We didn't have snow on Mars, we didn't even see the sky that often. But here it is different. There are no locked doors and I go where I want to. If I'm hungry, I just go to the cart and eat food. There is always water in the river, I like to sit on the banks and watch the fish play.

I still remember the day we came here. I watched as the ship slowly dropped onto Earth. All the kids had been told to stay in their rooms but I sneaked onto the bridge when no one was looking. The Earth looks so beautiful and open from space. After we landed, we went to the Science Towers. It is ugly to look at and even uglier from the inside. Thankfully, we didn't stay long. Acelyn hurried us into a boat and we sailed away until we finally reached here.

Everyday, the grownups have meetings and decide what to do. I don't think they do much but Acelyn seems happy afterwards, so I guess they do something. Just yesterday, they decided that we should start searching for food. We also need wood, I heard one of them say we will freeze without firewood. Today, all I can hear is trees being cut down *chop* *chop* and then *craack* *crash*. Some of the others gather stones and iron, for building the houses, I wish they would hurry up!

When I grow up, I will be the leader, just like Acelyn. 


Read Part III.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Why Don’t We Raise Our Sons like We Do Our Daughters?

This post originally appeard in Women's Web: Why Don’t We Raise Our Sons like We Do Our Daughters?

One of the hot button topics right now in Indian media is the safety of women – or rather how our country doesn't really care about half its population. From rape, sexual assault, harassment (in streets, public transport, nearly every public place) to violence perpetrated on women, Indians are finally getting around to discussing taboo topics.
One refrain that caught my eye throughout these debates – both online and off – is the fact that the reaction of the majority of Indians is the same: girls should stay at home, not go out after dark, dress appropriately and so on if they want to stay safe. No one seems to bat an eyelid when laying down these precautions for women. Except that the reality is women would be far safer if all the men simply DID NOT RAPE or HARASS any person that looks remotely female. No one has to stay at home and become a hermit! That got me thinking further. F…

One Step Up

Diya
Diya forced herself to relax while the attendant spread a mud pack on her face. She’d been nervous all week thinking about today. This was totally unlike the little beauty parlour she went to every month for eyebrow threading and the occasional haircut. No, this was a spa and they didn't just cut hair here. They styled it. And that was only the beginning of all the treatments a woman could get done. Normally she would have been too intimidated to even set foot inside, let alone enquire about the prices which she was sure would be too high for her budget.

But this visit was a gift from her dear mother for her 30th birthday. Luckily for her, the gift card was for a particular package which meant she would not be gaping like a fool at the exorbitant rates. Once again, Diya tried to relax telling herself that these women were being paid by her. She employed them and as much as she was sure they were secretly laughing at her naiveté, Diya wasn’t the one working for a living. But de…